About Ronnie

Writing about life, Liverpool and anything else that interests me. As well as working with others to make the world a fairer and kinder place: http://asenseofplace.com.

Oh Rach

The Skyping begins. Rachel interviewing Sarah for her Can Do Women blog, January 2011

Still Ronnie, standing in while Sarah is New Jersey.

Is it still too soon? I want to write Rachel something lovely. Something as good as anything I’ve ever written. (Something as beautiful as her friend Chemobabe’s eulogy, or as world-changingly essential as Gayle’s) She deserves at least that. But I can’t, yet. I need to take the fact and my feelings about her death to the park, to the cathedral, to the river – to my sacred places. I need to tell them about her. And my sense of loss. Until I’ve done that I won’t find the words, my words, for my friend Rachel.

So, for now, here is a very short poem. Continue reading

Rachel and Sarah

Rachel, June 2011

Ronnie here, standing in while Sarah’s away

Early this morning I took Sarah to Manchester Airport for her plane to New Jersey, to join everybody else there and say goodbye to Rachel. Going there, at the same time and the same terminal, reminded me of a happier day last June, when Sarah set off to go and stay with Rachel and Anthony for a week. Later in the year the two friends both mentioned this magical week, when they published these two parallel posts about each other and their friendship, on the same day, last October.

My Friend Sarah, by Rachel Cheetham Moro

“This year I have spent a lot of time in Liverpool. Yes! The Liverpool of Beatles fame in Northern England. I was surprised to learn that Liverpool’s climate actually rarely sees snow because it’s temperate maritime and the city is a recipient of warm bands of Gulfstream air. So this is why I’ve seen daffodils growing in Liverpool’s parks in February. Spring comes early in Liverpool.

On the deck of the allotment

I’ve meandered down Penny Lane in March and have been a regular visitor to a wonderful public space known as an “allotment”. It’s a kind of cooperative where the good citizens of Liverpool may rent garden plots to raise fruit and vegetables or whatever their inner gardener desires.I’ve clomped around in garden beds and dug for spring onions of all colors, fresh bulbs of garlic, and delicious little new potatoes. I’ve picked tomatoes and cucumbers and wondered aloud what to do with them all. I’ve even picked a pomegranate. A tropical fruit grown in Liverpool? Must be that Gulfstream air.I’ve strolled down flower and tree lined rows of allotments. I’ve shaded myself under an apple tree and I’ve marveled at the bounty of the most beautiful pear tree I’ve ever seen. I’ve sat on the deck of the allotment shed, sharing a picnic and catching the last few rays of summer sunshine and I feel like I never want to leave. Continue reading

Rachel

Sarah's post card painting of Plot 44. Posted to Rachel early this morning, before we knew.

Earlier today we learned that our friend and fellow blogger, Rachel, from The Cancer Culture Chronicles died this morning from the effects of metastatic breast cancer. We will have a great many words to say about our beloved friend. But not today. Today we are too sad to speak much.


The Journal of Wishful Thinking

The greatest scientific book ever written

Today we have a guest post co-authored by two very well respected writers from the scientific, evidence-based end of breast cancer research. Ronaldo Hugo, editor of ‘The Journal of Wishful Thinking’ is joined here by hard hitting social commentator, Dandelion, who you first met here with Rachel, on Cancer Culture Chronicles and have of course met with us in ‘The Alternative Orthodoxy’.

After a breast cancer diagnosis, an early casualty in many people’s decisions about ‘what to do next?’ is, of course The Truth. In the desperate search for ‘why me?’ and ‘what now?’ many will believe any piece of half-baked, poppycock drivel, served up by well-meaning friends as ‘reliable advice’. And that’s why we set up ‘The Journal of Wishful Thinking’ nearly 30 years ago now. To build up a solid body of scientifically based thinking on what can and has worked, out there in the real world, where our grateful readers, such as my co-author, Dandelion live.

In all the years of publishing ‘The Journal’ (as we affectionately call it) every single piece of information and advice published has been verified as ‘quite possible’ or even ‘fairly likely’ by at least two readers, who are not both in the same room when we ask them what they think. We called this unique method ‘double-blind testing’ and of course it has since been widely adopted as the ‘gold standard’ by the entire pharmaceutical community. Kudos to us there, I’m sure you’ll agree!

So, fast-forward to now and Being Sarah asks for this contribution to her blog. And at first, I don’t mind telling you, dear readers, I was surprised. I had heard of the blog, of course. Who hasn’t? But what I’d heard did not encourage me to want to contribute. Continue reading

It all comes back

November 2007, picking Sarah up from hospital after her oopherectomy

Today’s guest blog, from guest Editor, Ronnie, picks up on Barbara Ehrenreich’s classic article ‘Welcome to Cancerland’. This one’s about ‘Carerland.’ It’s right next door.

So, it’s Monday evening, this week. Sarah’s just gone out boxing and the phone goes. It’s the hospital, offering Sarah a cancellation slot for her next surgery, this Thursday. ‘Do you think she’ll take it?’ I’m asked. ‘Well, I think she’ll hit the roof, blame me for the short notice, stomp around the house for a few minutes, and then agree it’s probably best to get it done now,’ I tell her. And an hour or so later, this scenario plays out, more or less precisely. Sarah takes the appointment, and immediately begins her blog about it, published on Tuesday.

Tuesday morning for me, I’m out on what’s becoming my regular run. From our house, ten minutes down to Sefton Park, once round the park, twenty minutes or so, then back up to our house – bit more than ten minutes, mostly uphill. Monday morning I’d skipped round this. But Tuesday’s different. In the end, my times are pretty much the same. But there’s a heaviness in my legs and in my heart. Skipping it isn’t. And half way round I realise I’m running through previous preparations for surgery, previous waiting rooms. And it all comes back. Welcome to Carerland. Continue reading