The N word

November 2011, me in Sefton Park. No nipple protrusion visible.

On the morning of 18 May 2009, a Monday, I am sitting on the edge of my hospital bed, wearing a surgical gown. Mr Koshy, one of the three surgeons who is going to operate on me today, is explaining the procedure before he asks me to sign the consent form. And as this is a DIEP breast reconstruction, the explanation is pretty lengthy. In short it’s the transfer of skin and fat from your abdomen to your chest to create a new breast mound. In reality this takes at least ten hours in theatre and involves complicated connecting of arteries and vessels to make sure the fat stays alive, but also skill in creating a breast mound that matches the other breast. And while he is talking to me Mr Koshy also says, ‘And in time we would like to make you a nipple as well.’

Ah. Yes. A nipple. How great would that be I thought at the time. But it also felt like such a long way off. I mean first I have to get through this surgery, for it to be a success – DIEP surgery can fail completely or partially, all graft surgery carries that risk – and then recover, then I’ll need more surgery on my other breast to match up once the DIEP has settled, and then we could think about a nipple. It all seemed so far away, so remote. And it reminded me of the day I found out I had breast cancer, back in February 2007, when I was told I needed to have a mastectomy, and I said, ‘Can I keep my nipple?’

So my DIEP surgery was a success, a few complications but nothing major. The next surgery six months later was also a success and I was, nearly three years after diagnosis, in possession of two breasts. At least they felt like my breasts to me. The decision to have breast reconstruction was not something I decided lightly by any means, and I was happy with the result and keen to ‘get my life back’, which is where I thought I was at that point. For my reconstructed breast I had a silicone nipple, cast from my other nipple and carefully and skilfully colour-matched by the prosthetics technician, Gina. OK, I hated glueing it on Continue reading