The story of Being Sarah

Today it’s exactly one year since we launched my book. You can see a 90 second film of me reading from the book here:

One of the questions people often ask me is, ‘How did you write a book?’ Well, it takes a long time and a lot of editing… and for me a lot of anger and determination. I wanted my words to be heard. So I thought my readers might be interested in the story of how my book came into being. And, fortunately for me, my good friend Rach over at the Can-Do Women blog has already written this, so I’m going to let her tell the story of Being Sarah. Many of you will also know Rach as the snarky and opinionated voice of The Cancer Culture Chronicles.

We did this interview on a Skype conversation in January 2011, the first of many hours of talking together which has led to a deep friendship, despite the 3,500 miles that separate us. You will hear more from Rach during the following month.

Thanks Rach for this and all our conversations. 

“Today I’d like to introduce you to Sarah Horton, author, artist, entrepreneur, blogger, filmmaker, activist and an all-round highly accomplished and creative Can-Do Woman. I had the pleasure of meeting Sarah through my other blog, The Cancer Culture Chronicles, an insider’s view of living with breast cancer in today’s society. I found Sarah’s story to be so incredibly inspiring, and I am delighted to be able to spotlight her achievements here today on the Can-Do Women blog. Here is a part of Sarah’s story.

Being Sarah

22 February 2007, day after diagnosis.

In February 2007, at the age of 43, Sarah was diagnosed with breast cancer. To hear those words uttered is a moment so terrifying and raw, that one barely has time to think, let alone be able to string a sentence together in any cohesive manner. Yet, that’s exactly what Sarah did.  Despite being paralyzed with fear (or perhaps “despite” should be read as “instead of”), Sarah began to write in earnest.  On the day after her diagnosis she took a leather-bound journal, had her husband Ronnie take a picture of her at their kitchen table, and  began compiling her thoughts, lists of questions for the doctors, research for treatment decisions; anything that seemed relevant to the horrifying road on which she was about to embark. Continue reading